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2nd night of violent protests in North Carolina over Charlotte police shooting

2nd night of violent protests in North Carolina over Charlotte police shootingViolent protesters rampaged through parts of downtown Charlotte as anger continued to build over the deadly police shooting of a black man and the wildly different stories about what happened from authorities and the victim's family and neighbors.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory declared a state of emergency Wednesday night in the state's largest city and called in the National Guard after Charlotte's police chief said he needed the help.

A peaceful prayer vigil turned into an angry march and then a night of violence after a man was shot and critically wounded as protesters charged police in riot gear trying to protect an upscale hotel in Charlotte's typically vibrant downtown. Police did not shoot the man, city officials said.

On Wednesday, hundreds of protesters who were shouting "black lives matter" and "hands up, don't shoot" left after police fired flash grenades and tear gas after the shooting. But several groups of a dozen or more protesters stayed behind, attacking people, including reporters, shattering windows to hotels, office buildings and restaurants and setting small fires.

At one point, television news helicopters showed protesters on the loop highway around downtown, trying to stop cars for several minutes before police arrived.

Authorities said three people and four police officers were injured.

The violence happened amid questions about what happened Tuesday afternoon when 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed in the parking lot of his condominium complex. Police did not release dashboard or body camera footage, but said Scott had a gun and refused several orders to drop his weapon. Scott's family and neighbors said he was holding a book.

Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney was adamant that Scott posed a threat, even if he didn't point his weapon at officers, and said a gun was found next to the dead man. "I can tell you we did not find a book," the chief said.

The first night of destructive protests began near the shooting scene, about 15 miles northeast of downtown Charlotte, Tuesday night. Dozens of demonstrators threw rocks at police and reporters, damaged squad cars, closed part of Interstate 85, and looted a stopped truck and set a fire. Authorities used tear gas to break up the protests.

The distrust of police continued after Wednesday's shooting of a protester. Many demonstrators didn't believe officers weren't the ones who shot the protester.

Calls for police to release the video increased. North Carolina has a law that takes effect Oct. 1 requiring a judge to approve releasing police video, and Putney said he doesn't release video when a criminal investigation is ongoing.

After about four hours, the violence began winding down. But Charlotte remains on edge.
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